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#1 2023-05-22 23:48:10

thrive
Member
Registered: 2023-01-04
Posts: 2,178

Meta was fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for Privacy

PwJYC8E.png
For sending the personal information of EU users to the U.S., Facebook's parent company Meta has been hit with a record-breaking $1.03 billion fine. S.

The social media behemoth has been given a six-month deadline by the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) to comply with the GDPR and bring all data transfers into compliance.

In addition, Meta has been given five months to halt all future data transfers from Facebook users to the U.S. S. The company also owns Instagram and WhatsApp, but they are exempt from the order.

The chair of the EDPB, Andrea Jelinek, stated in a statement that the infringement by Meta IE is "very serious" because it involves transfers that are routine, repetitive, and ongoing.

Facebook has millions of users in Europe, so a lot of private information is transferred. Organizations are strongly warned by the record-breaking fine that serious violations have far-reaching repercussions. ".

The lack of comparable privacy protections to the GDPR in the U.S. has been repeatedly highlighted by European data protection authorities.
S.
, potentially allowing American intelligence services to access Europeans' data because it was sent to servers in the U.S. S.

The decision is the result of a legal complaint made almost ten years ago in June 2013 by Austrian privacy activist and NOYB founder Maximilian Schrems over worries that E.
U.
User data is not adequately safeguarded from U.
S.
When moved across the Atlantic, intelligence agencies.

"Reasonable restrictions in U.S. law would be the easiest solution.
S.
Schrems referred to the surveillance law. The requirement for probable cause and judicial authorization for surveillance is acknowledged on both sides of the Atlantic.

"It would be time to provide E with these fundamental protections.
U.
clients of U.
S.
suppliers of clouds.
Other significant U.
S.
Under EU law, cloud service providers like Amazon, Google, or Microsoft could be subject to a similar ruling. ".

Schrems continued, "Meta plans to depend on the new deal for transfers going forward, but this is probably not a permanent fix. "In my opinion, the new deal has a 10% chance of surviving CJEU opposition.
Without U.
S.
If the laws governing surveillance are changed, Meta will probably have to keep E. U. in the EU data. ".

In addition, Schrems charged that the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) had repeatedly attempted to stop the case from moving forward, as well as to protect Meta from being hit with a fine and having to delete the data that had already been transferred—both of which had been overturned by the EDPB.

In response, Meta declared that it would appeal the decision, claiming that the fine was "unjustified and unnecessary" and that there was a "fundamental conflict of law" between U.S. and international law. S. European privacy rights and government regulations governing data access.

According to Nick Clegg and Jennifer Newstead of Meta, "Without the ability to transfer data across borders, the internet risks being carved up into national and regional silos, restricting the global economy and leaving citizens in different countries unable to access many of the shared services we have come to rely on.".

The business issued a warning last year that if required to halt transfers to the U.
S.
, it might be forced to stop providing "some of our most important products and services" in the E.
U.
A replacement for the Privacy Shield is anticipated to be finalized later this year, according to the Wall Street Journal, and will involve new transatlantic data transfer agreements.

It is the largest fine ever levied in accordance with the E.
U.
surpassing the €746 million ($886.6 million at the time) fine handed down to Amazon in July 2021 for comparable privacy violations.

This development also represents the third financial sanction the DPC has imposed in just one year. For improperly using user information to serve ads on Facebook and Instagram, the watchdog assessed a €390 million fine in January.

Two weeks later, it was found to have violated data protection laws by requiring users to "consent to the processing of their personal data for service improvement and security" and "making the accessibility of its services conditional on users accepting the updated Terms of Service." It was penalized with a fine of €5.5 million. ".

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#2 2023-05-26 19:34:29

Europ
Member
Registered: 2023-05-23
Posts: 1,641

Re: Meta was fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for Privacy

thrive;9831 wrote:

https://i.imgur.com/PwJYC8E.png
For sending the personal information of EU users to the U.S., Facebook's parent company Meta has been hit with a record-breaking $1.03 billion fine. S.

The social media behemoth has been given a six-month deadline by the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) to comply with the GDPR and bring all data transfers into compliance.

In addition, Meta has been given five months to halt all future data transfers from Facebook users to the U.S. S. The company also owns Instagram and WhatsApp, but they are exempt from the order.

The chair of the EDPB, Andrea Jelinek, stated in a statement that the infringement by Meta IE is "very serious" because it involves transfers that are routine, repetitive, and ongoing.

Facebook has millions of users in Europe, so a lot of private information is transferred. Organizations are strongly warned by the record-breaking fine that serious violations have far-reaching repercussions. ".

The lack of comparable privacy protections to the GDPR in the U.S. has been repeatedly highlighted by European data protection authorities.
S.
, potentially allowing American intelligence services to access Europeans' data because it was sent to servers in the U.S. S.

The decision is the result of a legal complaint made almost ten years ago in June 2013 by Austrian privacy activist and NOYB founder Maximilian Schrems over worries that E.
U.
User data is not adequately safeguarded from U.
S.
When moved across the Atlantic, intelligence agencies.

"Reasonable restrictions in U.S. law would be the easiest solution.
S.
Schrems referred to the surveillance law. The requirement for probable cause and judicial authorization for surveillance is acknowledged on both sides of the Atlantic.

"It would be time to provide E with these fundamental protections.
U.
clients of U.
S.
suppliers of clouds.
Other significant U.
S.
Under EU law, cloud service providers like Amazon, Google, or Microsoft could be subject to a similar ruling. ".

Schrems continued, "Meta plans to depend on the new deal for transfers going forward, but this is probably not a permanent fix. "In my opinion, the new deal has a 10% chance of surviving CJEU opposition.
Without U.
S.
If the laws governing surveillance are changed, Meta will probably have to keep E. U. in the EU data. ".

In addition, Schrems charged that the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) had repeatedly attempted to stop the case from moving forward, as well as to protect Meta from being hit with a fine and having to delete the data that had already been transferred—both of which had been overturned by the EDPB.

In response, Meta declared that it would appeal the decision, claiming that the fine was "unjustified and unnecessary" and that there was a "fundamental conflict of law" between U.S. and international law. S. European privacy rights and government regulations governing data access.

According to Nick Clegg and Jennifer Newstead of Meta, "Without the ability to transfer data across borders, the internet risks being carved up into national and regional silos, restricting the global economy and leaving citizens in different countries unable to access many of the shared services we have come to rely on.".

The business issued a warning last year that if required to halt transfers to the U.
S.
, it might be forced to stop providing "some of our most important products and services" in the E.
U.
A replacement for the Privacy Shield is anticipated to be finalized later this year, according to the Wall Street Journal, and will involve new transatlantic data transfer agreements.

It is the largest fine ever levied in accordance with the E.
U.
surpassing the €746 million ($886.6 million at the time) fine handed down to Amazon in July 2021 for comparable privacy violations.

This development also represents the third financial sanction the DPC has imposed in just one year. For improperly using user information to serve ads on Facebook and Instagram, the watchdog assessed a €390 million fine in January.

Two weeks later, it was found to have violated data protection laws by requiring users to "consent to the processing of their personal data for service improvement and security" and "making the accessibility of its services conditional on users accepting the updated Terms of Service." It was penalized with a fine of €5.5 million. ".

My out-take on this:

first: the insecurities of users data
Its been unravel that as good as the meta company app are, users datas tend to face a serious threat.
Developers response to Law 
This will be the 2nd fine made on Facebook manager and co.
I have known about,  the first occur when its was discovered that Facebook gain one of the highest traffics and a well paid affiliate site.
Can someone explain better.  Every famous high making entrepreneur faces a lots of questions.

Offline

#3 2023-05-30 10:42:51

Comrade
Member
From: Utopia App Client
Registered: 2022-12-30
Posts: 1,827

Re: Meta was fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for Privacy

Europ;10207 wrote:
thrive;9831 wrote:

https://i.imgur.com/PwJYC8E.png
For sending the personal information of EU users to the U.S., Facebook's parent company Meta has been hit with a record-breaking $1.03 billion fine. S.

The social media behemoth has been given a six-month deadline by the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) to comply with the GDPR and bring all data transfers into compliance.

In addition, Meta has been given five months to halt all future data transfers from Facebook users to the U.S. S. The company also owns Instagram and WhatsApp, but they are exempt from the order.

The chair of the EDPB, Andrea Jelinek, stated in a statement that the infringement by Meta IE is "very serious" because it involves transfers that are routine, repetitive, and ongoing.

Facebook has millions of users in Europe, so a lot of private information is transferred. Organizations are strongly warned by the record-breaking fine that serious violations have far-reaching repercussions. ".

The lack of comparable privacy protections to the GDPR in the U.S. has been repeatedly highlighted by European data protection authorities.
S.
, potentially allowing American intelligence services to access Europeans' data because it was sent to servers in the U.S. S.

The decision is the result of a legal complaint made almost ten years ago in June 2013 by Austrian privacy activist and NOYB founder Maximilian Schrems over worries that E.
U.
User data is not adequately safeguarded from U.
S.
When moved across the Atlantic, intelligence agencies.

"Reasonable restrictions in U.S. law would be the easiest solution.
S.
Schrems referred to the surveillance law. The requirement for probable cause and judicial authorization for surveillance is acknowledged on both sides of the Atlantic.

"It would be time to provide E with these fundamental protections.
U.
clients of U.
S.
suppliers of clouds.
Other significant U.
S.
Under EU law, cloud service providers like Amazon, Google, or Microsoft could be subject to a similar ruling. ".

Schrems continued, "Meta plans to depend on the new deal for transfers going forward, but this is probably not a permanent fix. "In my opinion, the new deal has a 10% chance of surviving CJEU opposition.
Without U.
S.
If the laws governing surveillance are changed, Meta will probably have to keep E. U. in the EU data. ".

In addition, Schrems charged that the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) had repeatedly attempted to stop the case from moving forward, as well as to protect Meta from being hit with a fine and having to delete the data that had already been transferred—both of which had been overturned by the EDPB.

In response, Meta declared that it would appeal the decision, claiming that the fine was "unjustified and unnecessary" and that there was a "fundamental conflict of law" between U.S. and international law. S. European privacy rights and government regulations governing data access.

According to Nick Clegg and Jennifer Newstead of Meta, "Without the ability to transfer data across borders, the internet risks being carved up into national and regional silos, restricting the global economy and leaving citizens in different countries unable to access many of the shared services we have come to rely on.".

The business issued a warning last year that if required to halt transfers to the U.
S.
, it might be forced to stop providing "some of our most important products and services" in the E.
U.
A replacement for the Privacy Shield is anticipated to be finalized later this year, according to the Wall Street Journal, and will involve new transatlantic data transfer agreements.

It is the largest fine ever levied in accordance with the E.
U.
surpassing the €746 million ($886.6 million at the time) fine handed down to Amazon in July 2021 for comparable privacy violations.

This development also represents the third financial sanction the DPC has imposed in just one year. For improperly using user information to serve ads on Facebook and Instagram, the watchdog assessed a €390 million fine in January.

Two weeks later, it was found to have violated data protection laws by requiring users to "consent to the processing of their personal data for service improvement and security" and "making the accessibility of its services conditional on users accepting the updated Terms of Service." It was penalized with a fine of €5.5 million. ".

My out-take on this:

first: the insecurities of users data
Its been unravel that as good as the meta company app are, users datas tend to face a serious threat.
Developers response to Law 
This will be the 2nd fine made on Facebook manager and co.
I have known about,  the first occur when its was discovered that Facebook gain one of the highest traffics and a well paid affiliate site.
Can someone explain better.  Every famous high making entrepreneur faces a lots of questions.

It has occur that darkweb and skynet are  once one  of the most secured websites but the more its start getting loud makes on the face of the global internet the more its purpose is been compromised, such as social media as well. As the Utopia p2p grows its fundamentally for the future use of the trading and hosting system it well good, and staying on the low as it is now is as much more persevering.

Offline

#4 2023-05-30 17:38:14

crpuusd
Member
From: Blockchain
Registered: 2022-12-13
Posts: 1,860

Re: Meta was fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for Privacy

Comrade;10826 wrote:
Europ;10207 wrote:
thrive;9831 wrote:

https://i.imgur.com/PwJYC8E.png
For sending the personal information of EU users to the U.S., Facebook's parent company Meta has been hit with a record-breaking $1.03 billion fine. S.

The social media behemoth has been given a six-month deadline by the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) to comply with the GDPR and bring all data transfers into compliance.

In addition, Meta has been given five months to halt all future data transfers from Facebook users to the U.S. S. The company also owns Instagram and WhatsApp, but they are exempt from the order.

The chair of the EDPB, Andrea Jelinek, stated in a statement that the infringement by Meta IE is "very serious" because it involves transfers that are routine, repetitive, and ongoing.

Facebook has millions of users in Europe, so a lot of private information is transferred. Organizations are strongly warned by the record-breaking fine that serious violations have far-reaching repercussions. ".

The lack of comparable privacy protections to the GDPR in the U.S. has been repeatedly highlighted by European data protection authorities.
S.
, potentially allowing American intelligence services to access Europeans' data because it was sent to servers in the U.S. S.

The decision is the result of a legal complaint made almost ten years ago in June 2013 by Austrian privacy activist and NOYB founder Maximilian Schrems over worries that E.
U.
User data is not adequately safeguarded from U.
S.
When moved across the Atlantic, intelligence agencies.

"Reasonable restrictions in U.S. law would be the easiest solution.
S.
Schrems referred to the surveillance law. The requirement for probable cause and judicial authorization for surveillance is acknowledged on both sides of the Atlantic.

"It would be time to provide E with these fundamental protections.
U.
clients of U.
S.
suppliers of clouds.
Other significant U.
S.
Under EU law, cloud service providers like Amazon, Google, or Microsoft could be subject to a similar ruling. ".

Schrems continued, "Meta plans to depend on the new deal for transfers going forward, but this is probably not a permanent fix. "In my opinion, the new deal has a 10% chance of surviving CJEU opposition.
Without U.
S.
If the laws governing surveillance are changed, Meta will probably have to keep E. U. in the EU data. ".

In addition, Schrems charged that the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) had repeatedly attempted to stop the case from moving forward, as well as to protect Meta from being hit with a fine and having to delete the data that had already been transferred—both of which had been overturned by the EDPB.

In response, Meta declared that it would appeal the decision, claiming that the fine was "unjustified and unnecessary" and that there was a "fundamental conflict of law" between U.S. and international law. S. European privacy rights and government regulations governing data access.

According to Nick Clegg and Jennifer Newstead of Meta, "Without the ability to transfer data across borders, the internet risks being carved up into national and regional silos, restricting the global economy and leaving citizens in different countries unable to access many of the shared services we have come to rely on.".

The business issued a warning last year that if required to halt transfers to the U.
S.
, it might be forced to stop providing "some of our most important products and services" in the E.
U.
A replacement for the Privacy Shield is anticipated to be finalized later this year, according to the Wall Street Journal, and will involve new transatlantic data transfer agreements.

It is the largest fine ever levied in accordance with the E.
U.
surpassing the €746 million ($886.6 million at the time) fine handed down to Amazon in July 2021 for comparable privacy violations.

This development also represents the third financial sanction the DPC has imposed in just one year. For improperly using user information to serve ads on Facebook and Instagram, the watchdog assessed a €390 million fine in January.

Two weeks later, it was found to have violated data protection laws by requiring users to "consent to the processing of their personal data for service improvement and security" and "making the accessibility of its services conditional on users accepting the updated Terms of Service." It was penalized with a fine of €5.5 million. ".

My out-take on this:

first: the insecurities of users data
Its been unravel that as good as the meta company app are, users datas tend to face a serious threat.
Developers response to Law 
This will be the 2nd fine made on Facebook manager and co.
I have known about,  the first occur when its was discovered that Facebook gain one of the highest traffics and a well paid affiliate site.
Can someone explain better.  Every famous high making entrepreneur faces a lots of questions.

It has occur that darkweb and skynet are  once one  of the most secured websites but the more its start getting loud makes on the face of the global internet the more its purpose is been compromised, such as social media as well. As the Utopia p2p grows its fundamentally for the future use of the trading and hosting system it well good, and staying on the low as it is now is as much more persevering.

Its rather good to be secured with steady services  than to  be out in a open while some hoping on your crash landing. If Meta crashes  just wondering the damage it will bring towards other people's business.  At least with Utopia there's a big chances of  getting some where.

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#5 2023-05-31 01:17:09

oba
Member
Registered: 2023-01-13
Posts: 1,858

Re: Meta was fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for Privacy

The Meta being fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for privacy is a good one because the Facebook CEO and his project are always abuse user privacy

Offline

#6 2023-05-31 18:53:50

crpuusd
Member
From: Blockchain
Registered: 2022-12-13
Posts: 1,860

Re: Meta was fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for Privacy

oba;11018 wrote:

The Meta being fined a record $1.3 billion by EU authorities for privacy is a good one because the Facebook CEO and his project are always abuse user privacy

The wrong decision made so far as led to this. I can also imagine once some is in possession of your contact automatically the  Facebook we actually put out the person profile. Its like a wide fire spreading around the media. Only the wise will choose a secure system just like the Utopia p2p ecosystem users.

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